RADAR VECTORING DEPARTURES

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Peter Armstrong
ZSE Controller
ZSE Controller
Posts: 399
Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2015 8:05 am

RADAR VECTORING DEPARTURES

Post by Peter Armstrong » Sun Oct 15, 2017 4:16 am

The old saying is “we learn something new every day”. And, during my time as a radar controller I have learnt a lot of things. One small titbit I have learnt is “deduct or add when directing departures”.

What do I mean by this? Well, let’s take an example, a departures from 16L, first fix NORMY. Under normal circumstances – and with the correct Nav equipment on board – I would give the A/C “radar contact, climb and maintain 15000, clrd direct Normy”

However, if the Nav equipment on board requires radar vectoring, then I would give two distinct instructions = “radar contact, climb and maintain 15000”, followed by “turn left Hdg XXX direct Normy”.

Now, it is this “turn left Hdg XXX” which I now use differently from when I was training to become a radar controller. Consider this – when an A/C departs 16L and flies runway heading, and that A/C continues along the fly runway heading route, then the turn to Normy decreases (the anticlockwise scenario).

For example, if the turn to Normy was given (this example here is just to highlight the degree of difference – I do not use this example LOL) at TIFYS, then the turn would be 058 degs (I know, we don’t do that!) The nearest 5 degree would suffice = 060 degs. Now then, suppose the turn was not given until ODBOE, this would be 048 degs (050 for proper purpose).

So, I call this the “add or deduct scenario” or, the “clockwise/anticlockwise scenario”. So, when considering, the pilot’s response to the instruction, coupled with the turning time for the pilot/plane to make, you have to adjust the turn instruction accordingly. In which case, my instruction for the turn to be given at TIFYS would be 050degs – not 060 degs.

On the other hand, if the A/C was departing west of KSEA, then that turn would be (first fix BANGR) – from TIFYS = 287 degs (instruct normally 290 degs) but, considering the above – now a clockwise scenario – I would give the turn to be 300 degs. My rule is then = anticlockwise DEDUCT. Clockwise ADD

Hope this makes sense. This is just my personal choice that I have made under my own cognisance – no INS/MTR advice whatsoever. Not part of my training.

Controlling with enjoyment :lol:
Happy controlling/flying :beer:
Valor Morghulis
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Peter Armstrong
ZSE Controller
ZSE Controller
Posts: 399
Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2015 8:05 am

Re: RADAR VECTORING DEPARTURES

Post by Peter Armstrong » Sun Oct 15, 2017 4:26 am

Just as a footnote - I apply this method to other areas of my radar vectoring - not just restricted to departures!

Have fun and experiment when controlling - evolve! :beer:
Happy controlling/flying :beer:
Valor Morghulis
Valor Dohaeris
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Peter Armstrong
ZSE Controller
ZSE Controller
Posts: 399
Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2015 8:05 am

Re: RADAR VECTORING DEPARTURES

Post by Peter Armstrong » Mon Oct 16, 2017 2:19 am

Footnote No. 2 – Radar vectoring for the PTAC I treat slightly different. I sometimes use “TV” (“technical vectoring”).
Consider this:- An A/C is on the Hawkz arrival into KSEA/ILS RWY 16C. Upon initial contact - just prior to entering the TRACON - I anchor the A/C to Hawkz. Following successful contact/ID/Sqk etc., I then anchor the A/C to say, Anvil on 16C. At this point the Anchor shows approximately 360 degs on the heading part of the anchor. This is just an approximation!!!! It depends when you anchor and when you take the reading.
As the A/C continues on the Hawkz arrival – travelling north ( heading approximately 340 degs) – the anchor heading starts to alter (clockwise) and when the A/C is abeam Anvil the anchor heading shows 070 degs. Shifted from about 360 degs – clockwise – to 070 degs.
That indication gives me the prompt to turn the A/C onto the base leg with a right turn to 070 degs. This turn, and the time to receive and act upon the instruction, starts the anchor heading indicator to increase for Anvil (remember the Clockwise rule?) from 070 – 080 – 090 – etc., until the A/c is actually on the base leg and is travelling on a heading of 070 degs and the anchor reading to Anvil is still increasing (clockwise), creeping from 070 degs to 130 degs ( and beyond if you let it LOL)
Now comes the critical decision – when to give the final PTAC instruction to a heading of 130 degs (a 30 deg interception to the Localiser, 16C). Normally, I have a gut feeling when to give this turn.
However, if I have time on my hands, I practice what I call “technical vectoring” (“TV”). For this turn to be successful it is best executed on a 30 deg angle of interception to the localiser. Which in this case, would be a right turn instruction of 130 degs from the base leg.
However, as mentioned before, if using the “TV” approach I instruct the A/C to turn when the Anchor heading indicates a heading of about 115 degs to Anvil (15 degs before the 130 degs anchor indication). This gives time for the pilot to absorb the instruction and execute the same.
Hopefully, this results in a smooth intercept of the localiser on a heading of 130 degs and at an angle of 30 degs to Anvil.
I adjust this method depending on how the A/C has performed since first contact. Some experienced pilots can almost instantly turn upon receipt of an instruction, whilst others may require more time to absorb and act upon the receipt. In which case, the above scenario (“115” degs) is adjusted (+ or -) accordingly.
I know, it all sounds and looks so technical! But, it’s what I do, and I keep practising this method when I have little traffic – sort of like experimenting – and by so doing, it starts to become routine, and I think I am becoming more at ease with this method – particularly if my gut feeling is not feeling too good all the time!!!! 

Table showing approx. anchor headings to Anvil when A/C is above POINT

POINT

Hawkz 360 degs
Pikez 355
Breve 355
Nettz 360
Kwest 005
Abeam KSEA 010
Vashn 020
Abeam Anvil 070
Heading 070 about 115 – now I give the A/C the PTAC!
happy controlling - enjoy :banjo:
Happy controlling/flying :beer:
Valor Morghulis
Valor Dohaeris
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